(1:9) “Eishe Raiach Nechoach L’Hashem-A fire offering, a satisfying aroma to Hashem.” This idea of satisfying aroma is given additional meaning by R. Eliezer Askenazi. He says that when the Torah uses this expression, it is not to have us appreciate the great value of the sacrifice, on the contrary, it is to have us appreciate its inadequacy. Since the person bringing the offering might think that his sin is pardoned, the Torah informs him that this is not so. This sacrifice is only a satisfying aroma, a hint of what that person could do in the future. A pleasing aroma from afar hints at the existence of an object that is even better than its aroma. So too the sacrifice is an indication of the Maasim Tovim to come. Therefore the word Aroma is used to designate something whose approach is felt before it is actually present. The Korban is merely giving evidence of what he intends to do.

   Rashi explains based on a Midrash that Hashem has Nachas Ruach from the fact that His word was spoken and his children comply. The question is if that is the case why is this term only mentioned here and only in regard to certain sacrifices? Every Mitzvah performed is a case of “His word spoken and his children complying.” Why are these sacrifices singled out?

  If we look at the first mention of a concept in the Torah we can glean a better understanding of its root. At the end of Parshas Noach we find the first mention of a “satisfying aroma.” After the flood, when Noach emerged from the ark, he brought a sacrifice which was totally consumed. Perhaps we could suggest that this phrase is used only in a case where there is no gain for the one performing the sacrifice. Every subsequent mention of a “satisfying aroma” is either by a Korban Olah or Mincha each of which is totally consumed. The owner has no share in the sacrifice. Giving of themselves with nothing in return is the ultimate expression of sacrifice.

   However there are several discrepancies with regard to how this phrase is expressed. Of the 33 times it appears in the Torah it is spelled with a “Vav” in the word “Nichoach” only 3 times. The other times it appears without the “Vav”. But in the first mention of this “satisfying aroma” in the Torah, the root of this concept, we see a unique spelling, different than in every other incident. There it uses the letter “Hey” as the definite article in front of the word Nichoach (Reach Ha'Nichoach) which has a total numerical value of 307 with the letters, which is the same as the amount of words in the chapter of the ultimate sacrifice, the ultimate giving of one's self – The Akeidah.

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